Five strategies candidates are now using to stand out

CHIEF OF STAFF FIVE: Recognising they have a lot of competition for new job openings, candidates are now pulling out all the stops to ensure they get noticed.

From brushing up on key vocational skills to adapting their presentation style to suit the hybrid working environment, this installment of Chief of Staff Five lets you know just what to look for in the rapidly evolving labour markets.


Learning new skills


Candidates are taking online courses to update themselves in their chosen fields. There are free and paid sites offering courses on practically every subject matter, so it's now easier than ever for candidates to develop their skill sets.


Staying on top of trends


Candidates also know it's important to know the latest happenings in their professions. So jobseekers and reading news on niche websites (like Chief of Staff Asia!), taking part in online discussions, and following the social media accounts of relevant thought leaders.


Networking


While networking isn't a new concept, it's becoming more and more necessary amid the seismic changes taking place in workplaces throughout the region. It's important for candidates to keep in touch with former colleagues, even if they have never seen one another in person because of the movement restrictions over the past two years.


Attending to their online presence


With their newly-acquired skills, candidates are adding those credentials to their professional online profiles, such as LinkedIn. They are also removing irrelevant information to make them succinct and easy to read. At the same time, candidates are now much more cautious about their more personal online presence, and aim to keep even their online social presence as professional as possible.


Improving conversational skills


As many job interviews are now held virtually, having good conversational skills is absolutely essential. Such skills have always been important, but with things like "dressing to impress" removed from the equation, candidates have fewer ways to make a positive impression on prospective employers.

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